This blog is a place to archive project processes and techniques from Painted Threads with descriptions of how work was produced. I am including comments that contain questions and answers pertaining to the work from many of the original blog posts.

Tuesday, December 2, 2008

Mixing RIT dye

These are some of my favorite color combinations I came up with when mixing RIT dyes.
These dye recipes are all mixed with one cup of water

Apple Green
4 tsp golden yellow*
1/2 tsp dark green

Eggplant
3 tsp aubergine*
1/2 tsp black

Dark Olive
3 tsp sunshine orange*
1/2 tsp dark green
1/4 tsp black

Army Green
2 tsp golden yellow*
1 tsp Black
1/2 tsp dark green

Curry
3 tsp sunshine orange*
1/2 tsp purple

Pumpkin Spice
1 tsp tangerine
1 tsp sunshine orange*
1/2 tsp cocoa

Yellow Ochre
3 tsp golden yellow*
1/2 tsp purple

Terra Cotta
1 1/2 tsp tangerine
1/2 tsp cocoa

Blue-violet/Periwinkle
1 1/2 tsp royal blue
1/2 tsp purple

More Colors
Orange Ochre
3 tsp sunshine orange*
1 tsp purple

Lime Green
2 tsp Golden yellow*
1/2 tsp Kelly green

Leaf Green
3 tsp golden yellow*
1/2 tsp dark green

Mulberry
1 tsp purple
2 tsp fuchsia*

Violet
1 tsp purple
1 tsp royal blue

Olive Drab
2 tsp golden yellow*
1 tsp black

Wood Violet
1 1/2 tsp denim
1/2 tsp purple

Bronze
3 tsp sunshine orange*
1/2 tsp navy
1/4 tsp black

Light Olive
3 tsp golden yellow*
1/2 tsp black

Dark Terra Cotta
1 tsp tangerine
1 tsp cocoa

* powder dye
all other dyes are liquid dye
the liquid dyes are more concentrated colors than the powder

These dye recipes were used doing a low immersion dye method. See my article Quilting Arts magazine December 2008 issue.

19 comments:

  1. Judy, thanks so much for info! I enjoyed your article in QA and have wanted to try the RIT dyes but I've been a die-hard Procion person...now I will experiement! Thanks again!

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  2. Judy -
    thanks for posting the recipes! I too use procion dyes, but will definitely try the RIT dyes thanks to you and your article in QA and these recipes!!!!
    THANK YOU!
    <3 judi

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  3. hummmmmmm.......I can see RIT dyes will be on our list for sure!

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  4. Loved the article. Due to finances (not recession related) I have not been able to take Quilt/Art Classes so I learn by reading everything I can find - The Rit Dye article was a God send. I have two questions - Couldn't you set the dye with vinegar after washing and what is the best cotton batting to use. I can only find 80/20 in my area. Is 100% cotton batting necessary. Once again Thanks. (first time on a blog)

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  5. Thanks Verlon54, I am glad you found the information helpful. I do not know about the vinegar but it makes sense.

    I used warm and white for all my dyeing. The 80/20 will work but the colors may be a little less saturated, since the 20% that is polyester will not dye but the 80% that's cotton will.

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  6. Fantastic! What a treasure! I've scheduled a link to this post to go live on my blog Monday morning (Central USA time), December 22. I hope it brings you a few extra clicks.

    Denise
    http://needlework.craftgossip.com

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  7. Judy,
    You have fascinating blogs! Thanks for visiting mine, lucky me.
    Cindy

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  8. Judy,
    These are great. I am mixing dyes for the first time to make a shower curtain and these helped alot!!!

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  9. WOOOOOOHOOOOOO! I needed to match some Tie Bleached Black clothing. They are a tiger orange. Looks like your Punk'n Spice blend will do NICELY. I am sending your URL to ALLLLL SORTS of maker like people who are in to costuming. I hope they get LOTS of mileage from your posting.

    My tie bleach work

    http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pid=2944518&l=fbe6b7b310&id=621451388

    Thanks! Coreyfro

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  10. I thought it might tickle you to know, all these months later, that I am happily RIT-dyeing at home in the dead of winter with all the windows closed tight, and in the company of my kid, without a mask on -- thanks to that Quilting Arts article you did! The recipes are fabulous, thanks so much for posting even more recipes here. When the warm weather returns I'll be happy to venture back outdoors with my fiber reactive dyes but this is a very satisfying alternative.

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  11. Relentless, thanks so much for sharing that with me, I am thrilled that you are having such a great time with Rit!

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  12. Hi

    I found your site while looking for a Rit dye chart. I am a middle 50's guy who dyes nylon twine to make knotted rosaries. I am going to try your bronze and will eventually try more. Does anyone know if you can use the same measurements for the powder and the liquid Rit dyes? I'm assuming you can.

    Thanks for the new color ideas!!

    Brian

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  13. Hi Brian,

    the liquid dye is more concentrated than the powder. Because you are dyeing twine instead of fabric you will probably not need much dye to get pretty deep color and may need to experiment a little with the ratio of water to dye for intensity. You can also find a lot of color recipes on the Rit website now. www.ritdye.com

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  14. I've been using 3 quart canning jars, heating them in a pan on the stove and eyeballing for the most part the amount of dye I put in. For the most part it's been working out. I added another cup of water to your bronze recipe and probably could put in another cup. I usually loop the twine around my arm and then fold that loop in half and put half of that in the dye and let the dye 'wick' it's way up the twine. Whatever part remains white I turn around a put in the dye just long enough to get a third shade of color. It works real neat with gold , but I couldn't find the gold recipe, that's how I found this site. I know it's golden yellow and tan, but I forget the amounts (my wife suggested I add just a smidge of dark green to that recipe). When that wicks up the twine it gives the twine almost a wood color look.

    Thanks again for your advice.

    Brian

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  15. Your welcome Brian, instead of boiling cans on the stove, you can just add boiling water to the dye and mix it in the cans. The temperature of the boiling water is enough to heat set the dye.

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  16. Those are great colors, it's unusual. This is my first visit to your blog, and I love your posts here. Thanks for sharing this color combination. ~Jenny

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  17. how do i make color amber

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  18. make color amber with rit dye

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  19. Thank you so much for all the work you've put into dyeing with Rit dyes. It is so much easier for me to use this dye than the complicated cold water dyes I was using. It's especially nice for over-dyeing a small amount of fabric when I'm in a hurry. You are amazing!

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